Glenorchy factory manufactures treatment plants for Tassie towns

A LOCAL Glenorchy factory complex is assisting TasWater in its goal to end all public health alerts by the end of August this year.

Work is now well underway on the construction of four water treatment plants for Fentonbury and Westerway, Maydena and National Park in the Derwent Valley and Rocky Creek in the Huon.

The plants are all being fabricated in a factory complex in Glenorchy, where local company Stornaway is building each facility in modular form, which will be transported to site and set up as a fully operational water treatment system.

Customised for the needs of each town, the treatment plants will be providing water for communities ranging in size from 18 to 530 properties.

The assembly line process sees all elements of the treatment plant set out and put together like a meccano set contained within a space, which replicates the size of the building where the treatment equipment will be housed.

While in the factory, all equipment will undergo preliminary testing to ensure the electrics and other technical elements of the treatment processes are correctly assembled.

TasWater chief executive officer Michael Brewster said there were real benefits in building the treatment plants in this manner.

“It enables the skilled workforce and contractors to concentrate their efforts on one site rather than being spread over several locations, many of which are quite isolated,” he said.

“Being built indoors also removes the delays and inconvenience that can occur from the weather and other elements impacting on the construction program.”

Stornoway chief executive officer Brad Johnson said eight employees had been working in the Glenorchy factory.

“Stornoway has also engaged the services of 15 other Tasmanian subcontractors in delivering these work packages,” he said.

“On any day, around 50 Tasmanian workers are engaged in delivering site works.

“These projects are a great example of Tasmanian businesses working together to deliver critical infrastructure projects for our community.

“Stornoway is proud to be partnering with TasWater.”

Mr Brewster said this was a “very positive” Tasmanian collaboration.

“It’s the first time we have been part of a project building so many treatment plants at once and it’s great working closely with a local company using the latest technology to meet the needs of our rural and regional communities,” he said.

These new water treatment plants are part of TasWater’s plans to spend $467 million over the next three-years on upgrading infrastructure across Tasmania.

Following installation on site, the treatment plants will undergo a rigorous testing program overseen by the Department of Health and Human Services.

Caption: Stornoway project engineer Phoebe Nash with Stornoway contractor Liam Cole.