Emerging leaders inject fresh ideas into the community

SOME of the community sector’s best and brightest leaders have spent 12 months improving their leadership skills and making a difference in their local communities as part of the Tasmanian Community Fund’s (TCF) Emerging Community Leader’s program.

The second ever program concluded with a graduation ceremony at the Tasmanian Community Fund’s headquarters last month, bringing together participants, mentors and supporters of the program to celebrate their achievements.

The program included 24 leaders from Tasmania’s community sector and equipped them to positively contribute as a leader in their sector, with a focus on increasing their skills in governance, finance, leadership, management, communication, and project management.

TCF chairperson Sally Darke said the diverse group of participants in this year’s program showed that leadership came in many guises, with participants coming from around the state and bringing a variety of different skills to the table.

“Their skills were put to great use as the participants collaborated to devise projects that will make a difference in Tasmania,” she said.

“Through engagement with these projects, the ECL participants have not only developed their personal leadership skills, but given back to their local community in a meaningful way.

“These projects are the perfect example of community leaders working with local groups to benefit and support the wider community.”

ECL projects included ‘Creativity in the Car Park’, which strengthened community spirit and saw students from East Devonport Primary School and Child and Family Centre team up with ECL participants and local artists to add a splash of colour to their learning space by painting an eight-panel mural aimed at increasing aspirations.

‘Shake the Core’ supported primary school children to avoid suspension and expulsion through re-engagement with the school environment, ‘Project D’ offered a support service for fathers of all cultures and backgrounds, and ‘Integrational Conversations’ connected people of diverse backgrounds through the sharing of collective wisdom and lived experiences.

Registered musical therapist Alex Morse, who was involved in the Creativity in the Car Park project alongside five others, said ECL was a fantastic opportunity to meet and work with likeminded people who were dedicated to supporting the Tasmanian community.

Professionals from SRA Corporate Change delivered the Emerging Community Leaders program in conjunction with the TCF across the state, which was structured around four residentials (ten days in total).

“I’m pleased to say that our participants in the Emerging Community Leaders program all have a commitment to make a difference for the long-term benefit of their local communities,” Ms Darke said.

“We are now receiving applications for our third ECL program, which will commence in early 2019, where we will see new ideas, passion and relationships to grow our next leaders in the community sector. “

The Tasmanian Community Fund was established in 1999 following the sale of the Trust Bank.

Since 2000, the independent funding body has provided more than $98 million to more than 2,800 projects across Tasmania since being established.

Caption: The 2018 Emerging Community Leaders graduates.