Local teenagers blossoming at Karadi

A SCHOOL-BASED health and wellbeing program is seeing high school youth learn the arts of hairdressing, beauty cosmetic theory and personal growth and development.

“Blossoms” creates real life opportunity for participants by teaching concrete skills that can be applied in the workforce, as well as encourage them to work on personal development.

The program teaches hairdressing theory and practise, beauty and retail cosmetic theory and customer service.

Participants partake in goal setting sessions and work on communication and social skills, self-care and personal presentation.

Owner of Hair Gallery in Rosny, Emma Bradburn, who spearheads the program, said her feeling that there were children in high schools who were disengaged in classrooms and vulnerable in social situations was her drive to create the program.

“There is a lack of confidence and self-esteem in some young people and I developed a program to incorporate skills for certificate one and two in hairdressing and a bit of retail cosmetics certificate two skills for young people to grow,” she said.

“I wanted a program that could transition the kids into Tafe or further skills education, as well as help them grow and achieve the best of their abilities.

“I aim to create situations within the program where the kid’s self-esteem can grow.”

Ms Bradburn said the program was also about building connections within the community.

“I feel like there is opportunity being missed for youth to establish more connections within the community,” she said.

“Its about growing yourself and growing within the community and establishing relationships with people of all kinds.”

Ms Bradburn was contacted by Karadi family and youth worker Mark Watterson, who was working with three girls.

Mr Watterson said the opportunity for the girls to participate in the program with Ms Bradburn was one that couldn’t be passed up.

“The girls who have been here since the beginning are fantastic ambassadors for the program, especially as it continues to grow and expand and offer more opportunity,” he said.

Mr Watterson said he believed every young person had the ability to develop skills and make positive choices.

“All that kids need is a pathway towards success and a way to connect with the potential contained within them and when that happens, anything is possible,” he said.

The Blossoms program now has nine participants from the northern suburbs area all aged between 13 and 16.

Upon learning basic skills in hairdressing and retail cosmetics, the Blossoms have hosted pop-up salons throughout the northern suburbs and Hobart communities.

The program also has a developing relationship with Claremont College.

“Every Wednesday, Mark picks the girls up from their different high schools and I meet them and we either go out into the community to host pop up salons or do work at Karadi,” Ms Bradburn said.

“Social skills and personal development is what’s going to get these girls places, and that is what the Blossoms offers its participants.”

Caption: The Blossoms recently hosted a pop-up salon at Benjamin Court in South Hobart.