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MONTROSE PAINTS A PERFECT PICTURE

MONTROSE Bay High School students have been engaging with the arts on a number of projects to learn valuable skills and connect with the community.

A small group of Visual Arts students from the school participated in a mural project at the Metro Football Club.

The opportunity arose after Deb Moore from Metro Football Club approached the school’s Art department, which led to 11 students in grade eight and nine spending two full days at the site painting an image designed by grade nine student Grace Greggory.

“The mural project provided students with an opportunity to engage in some real world experience for those who were thinking of future careers or interests in the areas of the arts, such as design and illustration, spatial design, and mural painting,” Montrose Bay High School Art teacher Caitlin Love said.

“It also created a stronger connection to our local community and was linked to improved learning outcomes.

“The students really valued being able to take their art outside the classroom and spend more time with their friends in this setting.”

The mural design was the club’s logo of the soccer ball with wings, as well as darts and an eight ball to show the other sports the club is involved in.

The school has also been reaching out to established artists in Tasmania to inspire and teach the students.

Ms Love said having artists visit classes was a great experience for students to learn more about different art styles.

“It’s about providing as many diverse learning opportunities as possible for the students,” she said.

“The more they engage with different artists and their work, the greater the perspectives and ideas they can cultivate.

“COVID has been difficult because we haven’t been able to go to the galleries and exhibitions that we would usually, so it’s been even more important for me to try to reach out to practicing artists to enrich our classroom learning.

“The arts have such a great impact on our mental health, self-esteem and sense of wellbeing and belonging.”

Tasmanian artist Nathaniel Hiller was one artist who visited recently.

He showed students techniques to use before students had a go at doing a painting that was a cross between realism and abstract.

“There were a few students that were really good – probably better drawers than I was,” Mr Hiller said.

Mr Hiller has been painting for about 30 years, following in the footsteps of his father Peter Hiller and aunt Kit Hiller.

“Painting is a bit of meditation, it’s my attempt at calming my mind,” Mr Hiller said.

“One thing I really like about it is taking the kids away, taking photos and then reliving it through painting – it puts me back in holiday mode.”